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Wednesday, June 8
 

12:00pm

Pre-conference: Mindfulness and Mapping of Digital Practice: The Visitors and Residents Workshop

Pre-conference featuring our keynote speaker, Donna Lanclos, at Westminster College Alumni House. Additional advanced registration was required for the pre-conference. To check if you are registered for the pre-conference or for questions about the provided transportation between University of Utah housing and Westminster, contact Emily Swanson (eswanson@westminstercollege.edu) or Amy Kelly (akelly@westminstercollege.edu).

Workshop Description:

Visitors & Residents – the concept
Visitors and Residents is a way of describing the range of ways we engage with the Web. In particular, V+R encourages us to think about the social traces (rather than data traces) that we leave online. In Visitor mode, you might access an online resource in a purely instrumental way, i.e. simply to get some information. In Resident mode, you view the web as a series of spaces or places; you engage with people – not just with information. As a Resident you typically have a profile, and at the extreme end of residency you are visible to others on the open web, i.e. you will show up in search results (e.g. your Twitter profile, your blog, etc.).

We are never wholly Visitors or Residents, however. Our behaviour depends on our choices and our context, i.e. what we are doing and with whom. V+R is a continuum. Somewhere in the middle of these two poles, Visitor and Resident, is where a lot of online activity happens – behavior which is “resident in character but within bounded communities”, i.e. resident behaviour which is not visible on the open web. This would include interactions within Facebook groups, within members-only wikis or discussion forums, or in module discussion boards within VLEs, for example.

V+R mapping
Visitors & Residents mapping is a useful exercise for “making the virtual visible”, and thus for reflection. The metaphor helps us to talk about the digital as a space or a place: “the web is a place where we do stuff… mapping helps make it more visible.” In this workshop we will map our practices to spark discussion around the implications of the digital, not just as a set of tools, but a series of spaces in which teaching, learning, and other social interactions can and do take place.

Outcomes:

  • Participants see their peers’ online engagement and reflect on their practice.
  • Starting point for thinking about future activities around engaging students/staff online, open practice, digital capability, credibility of online sources etc.
  • Participants leave with a clear idea of the areas of their own online practice they intend to develop further, and why.
  • The workshop can be used as a starting point to explore areas such as Digital Literacy and Digital Leadership at an institutional level, going on to inform policy/strategy.

Links from Pre-conference:
https://www.jisc.ac.uk/guides/evaluating-digital-services
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_Visitor_and_Resident
http://daveowhite.com/vandr/
http://www.donnalanclos.com/
http://www.oclc.org/research/themes/user-studies/vandr.html



Wednesday June 8, 2016 12:00pm - 4:30pm
Westminster College Alumni House 1840 South 1300 East, Salt Lake City

5:00pm

Opening Reception

The Wednesday reception is included in the conference registration fee and everyone is welcome and encouraged to attend! The reception is 5pm-7pm at Westminster College Giovale Library, and hors d’oeuvres will be served. The registration desk will be available at the reception, where you'll receive your nametag and a printed schedule-at-a-glance.

We will be offering free shuttles between the University of Utah residence halls and Westminster College for the reception. Transportation pickup will begin at 4:30pm on the west side of the residence halls' Heritage Center by the campus shuttle stop--please arrive a little before 4:30pm, as we'll need to load quickly since this location is very near a campus shuttle stop. Shuttles will run continuously between Westminster and the Heritage Center throughout the reception and Dine Arounds. A conference volunteer will be at the shuttle stop beginning at 4pm to answer questions. The photo below shows the Heritage Center shuttle stop.



Wednesday June 8, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Westminster College Giovale Library 1840 South 1300 East, Salt Lake City

7:00pm

Dine Around
Optional Dine-Arounds will be after the reception, where you can checkout local restaurants with a conference volunteer (dinner not included in conference registration). A sign up sheet will be at the reception and pre-conference. Participants will walk to the restauarant, then walk back to Wesminster College to catch a shuttle to the University of Utah residence halls.

Restaurant choices are Kyoto (sushi, udon, sukiyaki, other Japanese dishes), Mazza (Middle Eastern cuisine), Flatbread Neapolitan Pizzeria, Fiddler's Elbow (pub food), Wasatch Brewery (pub food), and Epic Brewery (salads, burgers and higher end entrees).

Wednesday June 8, 2016 7:00pm - 9:00pm
TBA
 
Thursday, June 9
 

8:30am

Breakfast
Breakfast will be served in the Moot Courtroom Plaza on the 6th floor of the University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law. The registration desk will be available at the breakfast, where you'll receive your nametag and a printed schedule-at-a-glance.

Please see the Accomodations & Travel page of the conference website for information about campus shuttles, parking, and walking from campus housing.


Thursday June 9, 2016 8:30am - 9:15am
Moot Courtroom Plaza Quinney Law School/Faust Law Library Building - 6th Floor

9:15am

Keynote Address
(After keynote blog post from Dr. Lanclos: http://www.donnalanclos.com/?p=513)

The keynote address will be in the Moot Courtroom on the 6th floor of the University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law. The registration desk will be available outside the keynote room, where you'll receive your nametag and a printed schedule-at-a-glance. Please see the Accomodations & Travel page of the conference website for information about campus shuttles, parking, and walking from campus housing.

Our keynote speaker is Dr. Donna Lanclos! Donna is an anthropologist working with ethnographic methods and analysis to inform and change policy in higher education, in particular in and around libraries, learning spaces, and teaching and learning practices. She is Associate Professor for Anthropological Research at the J. Murrey Atkins Library at UNC Charlotte. Donna has conducted anthropological research in libraries at University College London as well as at UNC Charlotte, and regularly presents workshops and talks in the US and the UK. She has worked with various institutions, including Carnegie Mellon, Parsons the New School, the Wellcome Trust, Imperial College (London), Kingston University (London), and the University of South Carolina (Upstate), on issues of digital practices and institutional change. She blogs about these and other projects at www.donnalanclos.com, and you can also find her on Twitter @DonnaLanclos.



Thursday June 9, 2016 9:15am - 10:45am
Moot Courtroom Quinney Law School/Faust Law Library Building - 6th Floor

10:45am

Break & Walk to Marriott Library
It's about a 10 minute walk from the keynote at the College of Law to the Marriott Library, where the first breakout session will be held starting at 11:15am.


Thursday June 9, 2016 10:45am - 11:15am
TBA

11:15am

Fear of Fa(i)(l)ling: Abandoning Old Assessment Footholds for New Ground
In order to reach an authentic approach to assessment, we sometimes need to retreat from an entrenched position in our teaching and programming. At Davidson College, we recently faced this reality when re-evaluating our library orientation. The idea of sacrificing established methods of assessment threatened our continuity, but also inspired us to think about the measures that are truly impactful to student learning. This session will explore the costs and benefits of surrendering old assessment plans for new techniques and present strategies for developing authentic assessments, specifically assessment of students' conceptions about research via case studies in surveys and discussion forums. Attendees will come away with strategies for how to rethink library orientation in ways that allow for understanding and responding to student needs, and ideas for how to create assessments that will provoke conversations on campus.

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Crissinger

Sarah Crissinger

Information Literacy Librarian, Davidson College
avatar for Cara Evanson

Cara Evanson

Information Literacy Librarian, Davidson College
avatar for James Sponsel

James Sponsel

Information Literacy Librarian, Davidson College


Thursday June 9, 2016 11:15am - 12:15pm
Faculty Center Open Space Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

11:15am

Short Sessions: Business Librarians Get Critical: Examining the Intersections Between Business Librarianship, Critical Librarianship, and Critical Pedagogy / Trail Guide for New Teachers: Working with Graduate Teaching Practicum Students in First-year Wri
11:15-11:45 Business Librarians Get Critical: Examining the Intersections Between Business Librarianship, Critical Librarianship, and Critical Pedagogy

Business education is typically the embodiment of the neoliberalistic and capitalist-centered pedagogy that critical information literacy writers urge us to fight against, making it challenging for business librarians to integrate critical information literacy into the business curriculum in a meaningful way. Yet, the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) requires business schools to demonstrate a commitment to social responsibility. How can business librarians incorporate critical theories into a professionally-oriented degree program like business? In what ways can they use critical pedagogy to frame issues of social justice and social responsibility, especially those surrounding the flow of information? Topics of discussion will include connections between business education, critical theory, critical information literacy, and critical pedagogy. 

11:45-12:15 Trail Guide for New Teachers: Working with Graduate Teaching Practicum Students in First-year Writing

Come hear how one instruction coordinator librarian used the writing across the disciplines tradition to move beyond inviting new writing teachers to participate in one-shot library instruction to developing deep and lasting teaching collaborations. By assigning reading homework and conducting freewriting exercises during visits to the practicum class, librarians can engage new teachers in critically examining the crossover between writing and information literacy during their first-year as writing instructors. By assuming this role of co-educator, librarians have the opportunity to help first-time writing teachers develop collaborative relationships with librarians early in their teaching experience in order to lay the groundwork for sustained partnerships in teaching writing and information literacy. New teachers who are embarking on their career appreciate the support of a librarian and typically develop close, sustained collaborative relationships with the librarians that they work with which translates to a richer learning environment within first-year writing classes. 

Speakers
avatar for Ilana Stonebraker

Ilana Stonebraker

Purdue University
avatar for Sara Whitver

Sara Whitver

Instruction Coordinator Librarian, University of Alabama
Sara Maurice Whitver is the Instruction Coordinator Librarian for the University of Alabama Libraries, where she engages in program development, assessment, and strategic planning for teaching and learning.


Thursday June 9, 2016 11:15am - 12:15pm
Room 1008

11:15am

Pack Your Bags with Metacognition! Embedding Reading Skills in the Online Information Literacy Classroom
As librarians, we often focus our teaching on helping students gather and evaluate sources. To take online learning to the next level, how can librarians teach students to engage meaningfully with sources and develop strategies for reading academic texts? In this session, a community college librarian will share her experience embedding reading activities in an online information literacy course. These flexible, adaptable learning tools can be used in a variety of instructional scenarios, including one-shot instruction. Attendees will learn ways to improve students' research skills while also increasing their reading comprehension. This session is appropriate for all librarians who are inspired to encourage and develop academic literacy skills.

Speakers
avatar for Zoe Fisher

Zoe Fisher

Reference & Instruction Librarian, Pierce College


Thursday June 9, 2016 11:15am - 12:15pm
Room 1110 Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

11:15am

Finding New Paths: Leveraging the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning for Enhanced Librarianship
The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL)  can offer new ways for librarians to consider and study our practice, suggest new partners in classroom-based research, provide new opportunities for dissemination, and lead to better integration of our work and expertise within academia. There are strong parallels between SoTL and information literacy (IL) research and the fields have much to offer each other. The SoTL literature offers a broad range of discipline-based methods that may spark ideas for investigating student learning and research that can inform our teaching. The presenters will review SoTL basics, and ask participants to scan recent SoTL research and discuss ways to adapt ideas from these studies to their own teaching and research work. We will conclude by sharing ideas on how librarians can get started in their own SoTL work or partner with other faculty who are conducting pedagogical research.  

Speakers
avatar for Lauren Hays

Lauren Hays

Instructional and Research Librarian, MidAmerica Nazarene University
avatar for Margy MacMillan

Margy MacMillan

Professor/Communications Librarian, Mount Royal Univeristy
Happy to chat about anything; at LIW to talk about info lit and Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, and glimpses of threshold concepts in student interview data about their undergrad experience . Also interested in #critlib , pedagogy, food, and birds.


Thursday June 9, 2016 11:15am - 12:15pm
Room 1130 Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

11:15am

Walking the path together: creating an instructional design team to elevate learning
There is a growing  trend in academic libraries to enlist librarians with instructional design experience to assist with the opportunities and challenges of developing information literacy instruction both in-person and for online environments. In doing so, many institutions look for an individual who has the knowledge and skills to design, develop, and deploy elearning objects while also taking on more traditional public service responsibilities. Recognizing the varied expertise of instructional designers and the various skills associated with the development of eLearning objects such as sound instructional design practices, technology proficiencies, creativity and graphic arts, our institution has sought to create a team of instructional design librarians. The result has been the ability to create innovative and effective in-person and online instruction across the organization.  Attendees will learn how two instructional design librarians are able to systematically work together to address the instructional design needs of a large university library.

Speakers
avatar for Amanda Roth

Amanda Roth

Instructional Technologies Librarian, University of California, San Diego
Amanda Roth is the Instructional Technologies Librarian at the University of California, San Diego Library. She uses her experience with instructional design, information architecture and knowledge of user experience best practices to create and deliver information literacy instruction through the use of e-learning objects.
DT

Dominique Turnbow

Instructional Design Librarian, UC San Diego


Thursday June 9, 2016 11:15am - 12:15pm
1120 Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

11:15am

Demonstrating Dialogue: Using the ACRL Framework to Teach Scholarship as a Conversation
The ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education employs scholarship as conversation as a metaphor to describe the dynamic development of scholarly discourse over time. Many standard methods for teaching information discovery may encourage students to see scholarly work as static and universal, a position that prevents them from recognizing the evolving nature of this conversation and understanding the importance of practicing how to engage in it.  In this presentation, we suggest strategies for using the "Scholarship as Conversation" frame to design lesson plans, active learning activities and assignments that encourage students to understand literature in scholarly disciplines as a series of overlapping knowledge claims. We demonstrate ways to encourage students to frame their own scholarly inquiry as a response to these claims. Join us for a lively discussion as we suggest strategies for using this frame to invigorate the ways we teach students to engage in scholarship. 

Speakers
avatar for Sarah LeMire

Sarah LeMire

First Year Experience and Outreach Librarian, Texas A&M University
Sarah LeMire is the First Year Experience and Outreach Librarian at Texas A&M University. She is interested in information literacy instruction, assessment, scalability of instruction and outreach, and outreach to special populations, especially veterans.


Thursday June 9, 2016 11:15am - 12:15pm
Room 1705F Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

12:15pm

Lunch
Thursday June 9, 2016 12:15pm - 1:45pm
Gould Auditorium and Overflow Areas Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

1:45pm

Short Sessions: Like peanut butter and chocolate: Problem-based learning and the ACRL Framework in medical education / CANCELED: EnviRN-Evidence: Enhancing Nurse Capacity to Search for Environmental Health Evidence
1:45-2:15 Like peanut butter and chocolate: Problem-based learning and the ACRL Framework in medical education

Problem-based learning (PBL) offers a rich context for teaching using the Framework. This pairing requires planning in order to interprofessionally infuse faculty knowledge content with information literacy expertise.  Explore the foundations of PBLs and a method to directly teach practical and efficient research strategies while also addressing evaluative critical thinking processes. 

2:15-2:45 CANCELED: EnviRN-Evidence: Enhancing Nurse Capacity to Search for Environmental Health Evidence 

This session will discuss the creation of a new "tool for the trail" for nurses, nursing & allied health students, faculty and librarians. The Institute of Medicine notes that all nurses should integrate environmental health into their education, practice, and research, yet environmental health is poorly incorporated into nursing curriculum. In an effort to address this disparity, an interprofessional team ( a librarian, professor, recently graduated practicing nurse, and an instructional designer) from the University of San Francisco developed EnviRN-Evidence. EnviRN-Evidence, created with funding from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, is a publicly available, online tutorial that introduces users to the relationship between environmental exposures and health outcomes, and to the National Library of Medicine's environmental health resources. Attendees to this session will be able to utilize the EnviRN-Evidence tutorial in their own institutions, and the presenter will describe tools used and lessons learned during the creation of EnviRN-Evidence. 

Speakers
avatar for Claire Sharifi

Claire Sharifi

Reference Librarian, University of San Francisco, Gleeson Library
Gleeson Library, Geshke Center, University of San Francisco
avatar for Rachel Vukas

Rachel Vukas

School of Medicine Librarian, University of Kansas Medical Center


Thursday June 9, 2016 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Room 1130 Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

1:45pm

Drab to Fab: Elevated Practices for Active Learning Online
This presentation will illustrate how two instructional design librarians tackled teaching the drab topic of plagiarism and elevated it to a fabulous online tutorial.  Participants will gain insight into the techniques used to move online instruction from clicking an arrow to get to the next screen and multiple choices quizzes to an enhanced active learning experience that challenges pre-existing thought and builds knew knowledge and skills. Learn how instructional design practices, storyboards, proof of concepts, and technology combine to elevate the online learning experience by giving learners the opportunity to interact with tutorial content through the use of "You Try" activities that incorporate drag and drop exercises, animated video, sequencing activities and more. The presenters will also discuss how this online tutorial is being used to enhance course curriculum by integrating it into the platforms that faculty are using, from static web pages to course management systems. 

Speakers
avatar for Amanda Roth

Amanda Roth

Instructional Technologies Librarian, University of California, San Diego
Amanda Roth is the Instructional Technologies Librarian at the University of California, San Diego Library. She uses her experience with instructional design, information architecture and knowledge of user experience best practices to create and deliver information literacy instruction through the use of e-learning objects.
DT

Dominique Turnbow

Instructional Design Librarian, UC San Diego


Thursday June 9, 2016 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Room 1170 Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

1:45pm

Engaging with Empathy: Mapping the Path to Insightful Instruction
Empathy, or cultivating a shared understanding and experience with others, has emerged as a central component of communication, collaboration, and problem solving - skills all librarians rely on to craft successful instruction experiences for students, negotiate teaching relationships with faculty members, and cooperate with colleagues to create cohesive and effective instruction programs. In this session, attendees will explore a creative approach to developing an empathetic perspective as part of their professional teaching identity. After a brief introduction to the history and importance of empathy as a concept, attendees will practice using the User Experience (UX) method of "Empathy Mapping" as a tool to develop empathy in their instruction practice. This is a hands-on session, so come prepared to map a path to insightful instruction!

Speakers
avatar for Kimberly Miller

Kimberly Miller

Learning Technologies Librarian, Towson University



Thursday June 9, 2016 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Room 1150 Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

1:45pm

Class and Course Guides: Teaching or Tyranny?
The adoption of LibGuides by numerous Libraries has given rise to the creation of a multitude of class or course guides within the system.  Librarians have become enamored of such pages and spend hours developing pages for a number of classes. Many of these guides are then used in actual library instruction, or embedded into learning and course management systems as substitutes for face-to-face sessions.  Upon examination, however, the vast majority of these class and course guides simply replicate a version of subject guides.  Do these pre-determined lists of databases and ready-made widgets really offer students the opportunity to develop critical thinking and information literacy skills?  How do these pages allow for assessment outside of counting the number of clicks?  This program will present current research and evidence, offer suggestions for improving class and course guides, and challenge attendees to apply the Framework when creating class pages.

Speakers
NN

Nancy Noe

Auburn University Libraries


Thursday June 9, 2016 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Faculty Center Open Space Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

1:45pm

Extending the Arc of Learning: Infusing Information Literacy Throughout Students' Academic Careers
The Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education describes information literacy as "extending the arc of learning throughout students' academic careers and as converging with other academic and social learning goals" (ACRL, 2015). Ensuring that information literacy supports learning throughout a student's academic career and beyond is difficult to achieve by only embedding information literacy instruction in early general education courses such as freshmen-level composition and providing the occasional one-shot instruction session. In this panel discussion we will explore what information literacy instruction might look like when thoroughly integrated throughout the curriculum as part of gateway courses that are required for entry into a major and senior capstone courses in the different disciplines. How can we best familiarize students with the information ecosystem and knowledge practices specific to their future professions? What are ways in which we can teach students to effectively use information for learning in their fields of interest and for individual growth?

Speakers
avatar for Anne Diekema

Anne Diekema

Gerald R. Sherratt Library, Southern Utah University
avatar for Caitlin Gerrity

Caitlin Gerrity

Library Media Program Director, Southern Utah University
Gerald R. Sherratt Library, Southern Utah University
avatar for Phil Roche

Phil Roche

Outreach and Instruction Librarian, Southern Utah University
Gerald R. Sherratt Library, Southern Utah University | Outreach & Marketing | Library Instruction | Academic libraries and student retention


Thursday June 9, 2016 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Gould Auditorium Open Space Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

2:45pm

Break
Thursday June 9, 2016 2:45pm - 3:00pm
Gould Auditorium and Overflow Areas Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

3:00pm

The Road Untravelled: Alternative Outreach for Instruction
The Information Literacy and Outreach (ILO) department at the University of Central Florida has gone beyond the traditional outreach model to also target specific on-campus partners who work with faculty and students. These partnerships have fostered many opportunities for librarians to teach in online and face-to-face classes. This lightning-round style session will discuss the various projects and instruction opportunities that have resulted from our alternative outreach methods. The 45 minute session will be broken into 3-5 minute descriptions and demonstrations of the various projects, and will include information on how we have evaluated and modified these partnerships over time. Attendees will be able to map out potential outreach targets, develop strategies to gain useful information about partners, identify mutually beneficial projects, and create an action plan that distributes the workload amongst their library team.  

Speakers
avatar for Carrie Moran

Carrie Moran

User Engagement Librarian, University of Central Florida
avatar for Rachel Mulvihill

Rachel Mulvihill

Head, Teaching & Engagement, University of Central Florida Libraries


Thursday June 9, 2016 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Room 1130 Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

3:00pm

Short Sessions: Building a Learning Centered Classroom / OER and Digital Composition: An Instructor and Librarian's Perspective on Student Engagement and Faculty Support

3:00-3:30 Building a Learning Centered Classroom (Emily Swanson)

The Westminster College Library classroom was designed in 1997. On the original building plans, it was called the "computer classroom"; representative of the bibliographic, lecture-based instruction of the time. In 2014, we applied for and were rewarded a Library Services and Technology Act grant from the Utah State Library Division, Department of Heritage and Arts, and the Institute of Museum and Library Services to re-design the classroom. Our goal was to make a learning-centered classroom. We removed PCs to accommodate student's personal laptops. We added displays and used technology that allows us to un-tether from the podium computer. We bought modular tables that encourage group work and class discussions. We were collaborative in the redesign process. We worked with IT, we surveyed students, and we partnered with an environmental psychology class to assess the design. I will discuss: the process, the learning centered design, and the changes to our instruction.  

3:30-4:00 OER and Digital Composition: An Instructor and Librarian's Perspective on Student Engagement and Faculty Support (Cayce Van Horn)

Open Educational Resources (OER) provide a unique opportunity to break cost barriers and engage e-learning students with relevant, freely available texts. As both an English instructor and an instruction librarian, I have drawn upon my combined experiences in e-learning, information literacy instruction, and English education to evaluate available OER, select the most engaging materials, and build a composition course that challenges students to question the open education movement. Learn how libraries can support innovative technologies, enhance online learning, and foster the adoption of OER by locating relevant, engaging, accessible materials and supporting faculty involvement with freely available resources.  

Speakers
avatar for Cayce Van Horn

Cayce Van Horn

Business & Economics Librarian, Auburn University Libraries
avatar for Emily Swanson

Emily Swanson

Director of Access Services, Reference & Instruction, Westminster College


Thursday June 9, 2016 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Gould Auditorium Open Space Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

3:00pm

Scale Up Your Instruction by Sharing Your Resources: Deploy Wordpress as a Learning Object Repository
Instruction librarians develop a tremendous amount of instructional materials (i.e. learning objects) when they prep for teaching, and are often happy to share. If pooled, librarians' existing learning objects could dramatically, and sustainably, scale up a library instruction program by saving prep time and eliminating redundant development efforts. This presentation will illustrate a case study of how librarians at Cal State Fullerton do exactly this. Using the easy-to-learn platform Wordpress, the Instructional Design Librarian implemented a simple learning object repository to facilitate storing, sharing, and discovery of learning objects. As a result, librarians reuse and adapt their colleagues' work and have a prominent outlet to share their own materials with faculty and students. This repository increases library instruction visibility, and is expandable, through additional free and paid plug-ins, to function to as a simple Learning Management System. This presentation will outline strategies for attendees to set up their own repositories. 

Speakers
avatar for Lindsay O'Neill

Lindsay O'Neill

Instructional Design Librarian, California State University, Fullerton
Let's chat about eLearning, micro-credentials, or how people learn!


Thursday June 9, 2016 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Faculty Center Open Space Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

3:00pm

Critical Foundations: Intersections Between Critical Librarianship and First Year-Experience
Discussions of critical librarianship have been taking place for over a decade, and recent developments such as #critlib show the continued influence of critical theory on librarianship. At the same time, however, many librarians have found it difficult to incorporate these ideas into their work. To that end, this panel explores why and how critical information literacy (CIL) intersects with the First-Year Experience (FYE). Presenters from four different campuses will address past successes and missteps in this area, as well as outline their future plans for elevating how librarians approach FYE. The discussion will also take the form of a #critlib chat, so audience participation is welcomed and strongly encouraged from conference participants, as well as those colleagues who might not have been able to make the trip to Salt Lake City.

Speakers
avatar for Jessica Critten

Jessica Critten

University of West Georgia
avatar for Nicole Pagowsky

Nicole Pagowsky

Research & Learning Librarian, Instruction Coordinator, University of Arizona Libraries
avatar for Dani Rowland

Dani Rowland

Research & Instruction Librarian, FYE Coordinator, University of Washington Bothell & Cascadia College
avatar for Kevin Seeber

Kevin Seeber

Foundational Experiences Librarian, Auraria Libary, University of Colorado Denver



Thursday June 9, 2016 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Room 1150 Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

3:00pm

Undergraduates Crossing the Threshold: Assessing Library Interns using the Framework
As librarians and educators we are committed to student learning as our highest goal. To be prepared for a competitive job market, undergraduate students benefit from the opportunity to produce work that is available and impactful to a global audience. Internships in libraries provide students an opportunity to work collaboratively with their peers and learn from multiple points of view. Using an internship program in Humboldt State University Library's Special Collections as a case study, we will explain how students construct meaning and knowledge as they create digital exhibits using the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. By engaging interns in the process of metaliteracy the presenters are able to observe how the students demonstrate their understanding and thoughtfully apply their new knowledge, skills and habits of mind in the context of the internship.  

Speakers
avatar for Carly Marino

Carly Marino

Special Collections Librarian, Humboldt State University
avatar for Sarah Fay Philips

Sarah Fay Philips

Coordinator of Instruction and Reference, Humboldt State University


Thursday June 9, 2016 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Room 1170 Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

5:00pm

Tracy Aviary Extravaganza!!!
The social is included in the conference registration fee and everyone is welcome and encouraged to attend! The Thursday evening social will be at Tracy Aviary, at 589 E. 1300 S. in Salt Lake City’s Liberty Park. Dinner and drinks from Red Iguana will be served—they’re famous for their killer Mexican food. You’ll be able to walk around the aviary grounds and we’ll have a special bird visitor at 7pm!

Transportation--
Free transportation by bus will be provided. Pickup will be outside the southwest side of the Marriott Library at 5pm and 5:30pm (we will have two rounds of busses to transport everyone). Busses will leave the aviary at 8:30pm, 9pm, and 9:30pm, dropping off attendees at Marriott Library and Heritage Center at the residence halls.




Thursday June 9, 2016 5:00pm - 9:00pm
Tracy Aviary 589 E. 1300 S., Salt Lake City, UT, 84105
 
Friday, June 10
 

8:30am

Breakfast
Friday June 10, 2016 8:30am - 9:30am
Gould Auditorium and Overflow Areas Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

9:30am

Short Sessions: Knowing the Lay of the Land: First Year Course Programmatic Assessment Creates Benchmarking of Student Information Literacy Skills / Satisfaction Guaranteed: Elevate Learning Using the ARCS Model of Motivational Design
9:30-10:00 Knowing the Lay of the Land: First Year Course Programmatic Assessment Creates Benchmarking of Student Information Literacy Skills

Washington State University recently launched Roots of Contemporary Issues (RCI), a required first year course featuring a set of library research assignments and a culminating final paper. A group of RCI instructors, English Composition teachers, and WSU librarians conducted a series of assessment projects to gauge achievement of the information literacy student learning outcomes associated with the research project. This presentation will include insights about effective assessment methodologies, and reporting on the information literacy areas of most and least success for students. In terms of the Libraries' impact on student performance, the presenters will compare the IL achievement of students who sought library reference help and/or had a library instruction session with those who did not. The presenters will discuss adjustments made to the assignments in light of discovered data trends, and how the findings contribute to the larger university-wide assessment program.

10:00-10:30 Satisfaction Guaranteed: Elevate Learning Using the ARCS Model of Motivational Design

In the library instruction classroom, learning is elevated when students are motivated and they leave feeling satisfied.  There is a four-step process that can be applied during each session of instruction that leads to this feeling of satisfaction.  Janet Hauck has adopted the ARCS Model of Motivational Design for use in her library instruction, and she will showcase this model during her presentation so that other instruction librarians can experience it for themselves.  The acronym "ARCS" stands for Attention, Relevance, Confidence, and Satisfaction, and when these four elements are built into an instruction session, the result is a group of motivated learners. Janet has recently teamed with faculty in her university's Composition Program to apply and assess the use of the ARCS Model in her instruction sessions with their classes. She will outline her techniques, and also present an assessment tool.

Speakers
avatar for Erin Hvizdak

Erin Hvizdak

Reference and Instruction Librarian, Washington State University
avatar for Holly Luetkenhaus

Holly Luetkenhaus

Instruction Librarian, Washington State University Libraries


Friday June 10, 2016 9:30am - 10:30am
Room 1150 Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

9:30am

Canvas Commons: Scaling Library Instruction in the LMS
Canvas Commons, a learning object repository recently introduced by the learning management system (LMS) Canvas, is a new tool for the trail not only to elevate student learning, but also create new paths for integrating scalable library instruction throughout the curriculum.  In a quest to provide effective and sustainable instruction for our CEP College and Career Success program, the Marydean Martin Library at Nevada State College implemented a "Library Guide for CEP" module through Canvas Commons, which replaced previous one-shot sessions.  With only a couple of clicks, instructors can easily add the module, comprised of a variety of learning objects, directly into their Canvas course.  This presentation demonstrates how integrating library instruction through a LMS can support student learning and trailblaze the way for faculty collaboration at whole new heights.  Strategies, lessons learned, and future directions will be discussed for other libraries who hope to pursue integration within the LMS.

Speakers
avatar for Francesca Marineo

Francesca Marineo

Instructional Design Librarian, Nevada State College


Friday June 10, 2016 9:30am - 10:30am
Room 1170 Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

9:30am

Breaking It Down and Climbing Back Up: Learning Theories and Approaches to Instruction

Active learning, constructivism, critical pedagogy - these learning theories are more than just buzzwords. They're important instructional strategies that can play central roles in shaping and motivating learners. Rather than viewing theory and practice as discrete, mutually exclusive approaches to our roles as educators, this presentation will focus on elevating our teaching through praxis: the negotiation of theory into practice with a reflective component. Through a series of exercises and interactions facilitated by four experienced instruction librarians, this presentation will help you understand what these pedagogical practices mean and how (and why) you should be using them in your instruction.


Speakers
avatar for Erica DeFrain

Erica DeFrain

Assistant Professor and Social Sciences Librarian, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
avatar for Julia Glassman

Julia Glassman

Librarian, Lead for Collections and Writing Initiatives, UCLA
I'm interested in alternative media, zines, instructional design, and critical pedagogy.
avatar for Nicole Pagowsky

Nicole Pagowsky

Research & Learning Librarian, Instruction Coordinator, University of Arizona Libraries
avatar for Doug Worsham

Doug Worsham

Teaching & Learning Services Coordinator, UCLA Library



Friday June 10, 2016 9:30am - 10:30am
Room 1130 Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

9:30am

Traversing Difficult Tutorial Terrain: Moving from Plagiarism Perils to Student Scholars
According to the International Center for Academic Integrity, academic honesty violations have been on the rise at undergraduate institutions. Is there a role for libraries to play in academic integrity education? In 2013, one college requested that the central consortial library design a plagiarism tutorial for use as a remedial tool for students who had committed academic integrity policy violations. In this presentation, we will discuss that library's experience in developing an interactive online tutorial and associated evaluative tool to teach strategies for being an ethical member of a community of scholars. Throughout the presentation, we will highlight successes and challenges of our implementation approach, as well as concrete strategies for other libraries who are considering adapting this Creative Commons-licensed tutorial or creating their own tool for addressing academic integrity. We will include time for open discussion of the library's role in academic integrity education. 

Speakers
avatar for Dani Cook

Dani Cook

Information Literacy & Research Services Coordinator, Claremont Colleges Library
avatar for Natalie Tagge

Natalie Tagge

Education Services Librarian, Temple University, Ginsburg Health Sciences Library


Friday June 10, 2016 9:30am - 10:30am
Room 1725 Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

9:30am

Outside of the Academic Garden: Lifelong Learning for Engineers in Practice
Recent discourse in information literacy and scholarly communication has centered on questions of information access and privilege. In essence, when we teach students to use our highly-specialized, subscription-only resources, are we setting them off on a path up a false summit? At Northern Arizona University, we are partnering with our engineering program to tailor our information literacy curricula to students' long-term needs. We will present the results of our initial environmental scan, including focus groups and interviews with engineers, to better understand the information needs and access issues facing our graduates. We will also discuss what these findings mean for curriculum design, including not only open access options for locating engineering information, but broader issues of information privilege and access so that our students can navigate and help shape a more open and equitable future for lifelong access and lifelong learning.

Speakers
MD

Mary DeJong

Librarian for the College of Engineering, Forestry, and Natural Sciences, Cline Library, Northern Arizona University
I have been a science librarian since 1995 and joined Northern Arizona University (NAU) in 2013. I am interested in exploring the alignment between information literacy skills currently taught to undergraduates, and the skills those students will need in their careers once they graduate. I am also interested in information-access barriers students will encounter after they graduate.
avatar for Wendy Holliday

Wendy Holliday

Head of Teaching, Learning, and Research Services, Cline Library, Northern Arizona University


Friday June 10, 2016 9:30am - 10:30am
Gould Auditorium Open Space Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

10:30am

Break
Friday June 10, 2016 10:30am - 10:45am
Gould Auditorium and Overflow Areas Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

10:45am

Elevating the Discussion: Collaborating with Faculty to Re-envision Information Literacy
In a recently piloted First Year Experience course, new Concordia students were taken to the University’s top research units and asked to explore how the units engaged with the “here and now.” They used arts-based inquiry to examine the experience, honed their oral and digital presentation skills with ePortfolios and lightning talks, examined their university-readiness through psychometric tests at the Student Success Centre, and examined ACRL threshold concepts with their Teaching & Learning Librarian. There was a lot going on! This workshop will share ideas from the information literacy component – as well feedback from both students and faculty partners on ACRL’s threshold concepts, and what they see as priorities for first year students.

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Cameron

Andrea Cameron

Teaching & Learning Librarian, Concordia Libraries


Friday June 10, 2016 10:45am - 11:45am
Room 1170 Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

10:45am

Short Sessions: Guided Adventures in Team Hiking: Collaborations between Librarians and Writing Program Faculty to Flip the One-Shot Library Workshop / Digital Research Notebook: A Simple Tool for Reflective Learning at Scale
10:45-11:15 Guided Adventures in Team Hiking: Collaborations between Librarians and Writing Program Faculty to Flip the One-Shot Library Workshop

Librarians at UC San Diego teamed up with a writing program coordinator on campus to re-imagine the one-shot library workshops provided to all of the college's first-year transfer students. An online tutorial on database searching made up of multimedia and active learning experiences was created for students to complete the week before the library workshop.    / After learning about the research process, database search strategies and how to access articles in full-text, students were required to use their newly learned skills to bring printed articles they had found to the library instruction session. During the workshop with the librarian, students learned how to construct a research question.

11:15-11:45 Digital Research Notebook: A Simple Tool for Reflective Learning at Scale

Although deep, sustained engagement with students is desirable, many librarians still work within the confines of the one-shot instruction session, some at universities serving tens of thousands of undergraduate students. Librarians must thus find creative ways to work at scale in order to help students craft thoughtful research questions, scaffold their research process, and think critically about the sources they find. To meet this challenge, librarians at UCLA created a digital "research notebook" which, through a combination of video tutorials and reflective writing prompts, guides student through the research process. The notebook can be assigned on its own, as a pre-assignment for a one-shot session, or as the backbone of a credit course or research consultation. This session will discuss the pedagogical framework of the notebook and offer simple ways participants can implement it at their own institutions.
 

Speakers
avatar for Julia Glassman

Julia Glassman

Librarian, Lead for Collections and Writing Initiatives, UCLA
I'm interested in alternative media, zines, instructional design, and critical pedagogy.
avatar for Crystal Goldman

Crystal Goldman

Instruction Coordinator, UC San Diego Library
DT

Dominique Turnbow

Instructional Design Librarian, UC San Diego
avatar for Doug Worsham

Doug Worsham

Teaching & Learning Services Coordinator, UCLA Library



Friday June 10, 2016 10:45am - 11:45am
Room 1150 Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

10:45am

Roundtable: Professional Degrees and Critical Pedagogy, Too High For Us to Climb?
We will explore the intersections of critical librarianship and our instructional practices as librarians supporting professional degree programs such as engineering, accounting, or nursing. Topics of discussion will include connections between professional education, critical theory, critical information literacy, and critical pedagogy. The focus of the session will be a roundtable discussion with time for librarians to explore surrounding issues. Facilitators will include librarians from a large midwestern university, a large west coast university, and two small regional campuses of west coast universities.  

Speakers
RL

Robin Lockerby

Associate Director, Library Instruction & User Engagement/ Library Liaison to the School of Business Management | National University Library
avatar for Ilana Stonebraker

Ilana Stonebraker

Purdue University


Friday June 10, 2016 10:45am - 11:45am
Gould Auditorium Open Space Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

10:45am

Bridging the Gap between faculty Expectation and Student Experience: Teaching Students to Annotate and Synthesize Sources
Faculty across college campuses lament that students don't know how to read, evaluate, synthesize, and appropriately cite academic literature. Students express similar concerns. This presentation offers activities designed to demystify and empower students in learning two key steps of academic research: compiling bibliographic information and writing evaluative annotations, and reading and synthesizing academic journal articles.  Attendees of the presentation will leave with information on the need for and creation of these activities, hear of their application in both one-shot instruction and in credit-bearing environments in and out of the library, and be fully prepared to integrate these activities into their own academic environment.

Speakers
avatar for William Cuthbertson

William Cuthbertson

Instructional Services Librarian, University of Northern Colorado
William Cuthbertson is an Assistant Professor for Instructional Services at the University of Northern Colorado, teaching courses in undergraduate research skills to first-generation students within the Center for Human Enrichment and to students in the Honors, Scholars & Leadership program. He is the Libraries’ liaison to the department of Political Science and International Affairs, and the 2014-2015 and 2015-2016 University Libraries Faculty... Read More →
avatar for Brianne Markowski

Brianne Markowski

Instructional Services Librarian, University of Northern Colorado


Friday June 10, 2016 10:45am - 11:45am
Room 1705F Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

10:45am

Mapping Landmarks in the Territory: What Do Threshold Concepts Look Like to Students?
A long-term qualitative study of the student experience at Mount Royal University sheds light on how students perceive threshold concepts related to information literacy (IL). The transcripts of over 400 interviews provide evidence of students in various stages of learning, from seeing only walls with no doorways, let alone thresholds, to looking back at breakthrough moments in learning. While students use entirely different language to the ACRL Framework, they nevertheless describe understanding of the concepts, and related practices and dispositions. Understanding these concepts from the  students' point of view may assist with developing activities and assignments, that encourage crossing these thresholds, and assessments that can help both the students and us as teachers know when that crossing happens. After a brief introduction, participants will work with excerpts from the study to discern markers of learning related to threshold concepts and use those markers to generate ideas for teaching.

Speakers
avatar for Margy MacMillan

Margy MacMillan

Professor/Communications Librarian, Mount Royal Univeristy
Happy to chat about anything; at LIW to talk about info lit and Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, and glimpses of threshold concepts in student interview data about their undergrad experience . Also interested in #critlib , pedagogy, food, and birds.


Friday June 10, 2016 10:45am - 11:45am
Room 1725 Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

11:45am

Lunch
Friday June 10, 2016 11:45am - 1:15pm
Gould Auditorium and Overflow Areas Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

1:15pm

Short Sessions: Emerging with eBooks: College Students Create Digital Publications / Active Learning is the Hook: Developing Information Literacy Dispositions in First-Year Calculus
1:15-1:145 Emerging with eBooks: College Students Create Digital Publications

The librarian designed and taught a course where college students created ebooks. The timely project incorporated both information and digital literacy skills by following the lifecycle of an ebook from conception to publication. Students researched technology-related topics, wrote and compiled their book chapters, and converted those chapters into ebooks using web design software and an open-source ebook creation tool called Calibre.    

1:45-2:15 Active Learning is the Hook: Developing Information Literacy Dispositions in First-Year Calculus

Building dispositions "values, attitudes, and habits of mind" is an integral part of the learning process. The ACRL Framework for Information Literacy provides suggested sets of dispositions for each information literacy concept. But what are some practical strategies we can use to develop student mindsets about information literacy? One way is to embed information literacy assignments into foundational courses that use active, student-centered teaching methods. This presentation will discuss a librarian-faculty collaboration at California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo where "learn by doing" library assignments are integrated into Inquiry-based Learning (IBL) Mathematics courses. Attendees will see sample assignments and student work that demonstrates how information literacy dispositions fit well with assignments on effective thinking, and take away ideas for finding new "footholds" in the curriculum.

Speakers
avatar for Kaila Bussert

Kaila Bussert

Foundational Experiences Librarian, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo
Kaila Bussert is the Foundational Experiences Librarian at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, where she leads a foundational information literacy program. Her research interests center on the role of visual literacy across the disciplines of science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics. She is co-author of the recently published book, Visual Literacy for Libraries: A Practical, Standards-Based Guide.
avatar for Kate Lucey

Kate Lucey

Education Librarian, Miami University, Oxford
Kate Lucey is education librarian and instructor at Miami University in Ohio. She teaches a survey course on information and digital literacy that combines theoretical and practical exposure to a range of current topics in technology. She also promotes research in the context of information studies so that students gain experience with writing, critical thinking, and argumentation. Beyond introducing cool content, Ms. Lucey applies pedagogical... Read More →



Friday June 10, 2016 1:15pm - 1:45pm
Room 1150 Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

1:15pm

Short Sessions: Enhancing the Common Reading Experience Through Library Instruction / Foothills to Fourteeners: Preparing Students for Research in the Real World
1:15-1:45 Enhancing the Common Reading Experience Through Library Instruction

Common reading programs can facilitate shared academic experiences for first-year students. As common reading often serves as an entry point for inquiry in the first year, instruction librarians have a role to play in such programs. This session will focus on an academic library's support of inquiry in freshman seminar courses through the common reading program. The library took advantage of opportunities presented by online learning technologies to create an interactive learning experience for first-year students. The library created interactive online learning modules to guide first-year students through the inquiry process. The modules use examples from the common reading and feature a variety of exercises to promote active learning.  The presenter will detail development of the modules, including technologies utilized in their design and strategies for incorporating active learning. Attendees will learn how online learning and library instruction can be joined to enhance the common reading experience.  

1:45-2:15 Foothills to Fourteeners: Preparing Students for Research in the Real World

How do we convey the importance of research skills outside of academic contexts? How do we position students as lifelong learners? How can we show transferability of research skills from academic to real world problems? Preparing students to find credible, reliable information even after their subscription access has ended is often an indirect goal for instruction librarians but is rarely the focus of a standalone research workshop. This case study highlights how Keller's ARCS Model of Motivational Design and Problem-Based Learning can be used to scaffold research skills for life beyond college. These frameworks are effective for engaging nontraditional students and can be adapted to even one-shot classes to build students' research skills through simulations of real-life research scenarios. 

Speakers
avatar for Marc Bess

Marc Bess

Instruction Librarian, University of North Carolina at Charlotte
I am an instruction librarian and instructional designer at J. Murrey Atkins Library at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte.
avatar for Lindsay Roberts

Lindsay Roberts

Education Librarian, University of Colorado Boulder
Lindsay Roberts is an Assistant Professor at University of Colorado Boulder and subject liaison to the School of Education and Department of Linguistics. Her research interests focus on motivational design, transfer of learning, and metacognition/metaliteracy, particularly as they relate to adult learners. Roberts earned her MLIS from University of Denver and her BA in French and Humanities from CU Boulder. Before joining the University... Read More →


Friday June 10, 2016 1:15pm - 2:15pm
Room 1130 Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

1:15pm

Peaks, Valleys and Vistas: How Online Learning Can Reshape the Information Literacy Instruction Landscape
Westminster College's first-year composition courses have generally been taught in person, with two accompanying information literacy instruction sessions. However, several composition courses have recently been taught online, and the librarians wanted to make sure that the corresponding online information course stayed engaging and interactive. The college's instructional designer and a librarian teamed up to implement the three pillars of the Community of Inquiry theory for online education as well as activities that addressed the new ACRL Information Literacy Framework. The online IL course will now consist of a combination of interactive tutorials, moderated discussion forums, and activities that help merge the ACRL standards and the framework's threshold concepts. Objectives for the session will include offering examples of how the framework can work for in-person and online information literacy instruction; presenting the Community of Inquiry model as a theoretical basis for online learning; and providing resources for Instructional Design best practices.

Speakers
avatar for Amy Kelly

Amy Kelly

Director of Collections, Instruction and Outreach, Westminster College
As far as being a librarian goes, I'm interested in curriculum development, online instruction and design, digital scholarship, outreach and administration. In addition to work, I'm a professional tennis umpire, and I love playing tennis, hiking, and reading.
avatar for James Morris

James Morris

Instructional Designer, Westminster College
I have an interest in systematic design, multimedia learning, user experience, and all things instructional design. I studied Instructional Design & Educational Technology at the University of Utah. In my spare time, I enjoy biking, travel, and spending time with friends.


Friday June 10, 2016 1:15pm - 2:15pm
Room 1170 Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

1:15pm

Addressing Cultural Humility and Implicit Bias in Information Literacy Sessions
Learning cultural humility and bias-reducing strategies for those who work with diverse populations is critical for students and librarians. Our profession can play an important role in introducing these concepts and strategies. However, addressing implicit bias and cultural humility in information literacy classes can be difficult. Library staff may be unfamiliar with the concepts or uncertain about how to incorporate them into classes, have little control over class content, or have little time to address these topics. In this session, we describe how we incorporated concepts of cultural humility and implicit bias over five information literacy sessions per course in the three first-year courses for students interested in the medical professions. Attendees will be able to define implicit bias and cultural humility, recognize their own biases, understand why teaching and learning about cultural humility and implicit bias is useful, and incorporate strategies learned in this session into their own classes.

Speakers
TH

Twanna Hodge

J. Willard Marriott Library, University of Utah
AM

Alfred Mowdood

J. Willard Marriott Library, University of Utah


Friday June 10, 2016 1:15pm - 2:15pm
Room 1725 Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

1:15pm

Lofty Conversations, Grounded Teaching: Threshold Concepts, Decoding the Disciplines, and Our Pedagogical Praxis
Few would deny that developing concrete strategies for teaching threshold concepts like those outlined in the ACRL Framework can be overwhelming. The Decoding the Disciplines process, an approach to instructional planning that begins with identifying where students become "stuck" in the learning process (Pace and Middendorf, 2004), provides a guided but flexible structure for such instructional planning. Participants will be introduced to the Decoding the Disciplines model, explore how Decoding relates to the theory of threshold concepts, apply the Decoding model to identifying their instructional priorities for a teaching scenario, and consider Decoding as a catalyst for cross-disciplinary dialogue. 

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Baer

Andrea Baer

Instructional Services Librarian, University of West Georgia
Andrea Baer recently joined the University of West Georgia as an Instructional Services Librarian. Previously she was the Undergraduate Education Librarian at Indiana University Libraries. Andrea also teaches professional development courses on information literacy education at Library Juice Academy. Prior to becoming a librarian Andrea instructed college courses in English composition, literature, and language at the University of Washington... Read More →


Friday June 10, 2016 1:15pm - 2:15pm
Gould Auditorium Open Space Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

2:15pm

Break
Friday June 10, 2016 2:15pm - 2:30pm
Gould Auditorium and Overflow Areas Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

2:30pm

Short Session: Journey Mapping for Enhanced User Experience / Bringing Student Learning to Life: A Faculty/Librarian Partnership Through the Human Library
2:30-3:00 Journey Mapping for Enhanced User Experience

Journey mapping plots a process or service to produce a visual representation of a library transaction from the point at which the student accesses a service to its final resolution. Service scenarios are identified, and maps are produced that reflect the journey from the student's point of view. The map is then used to develop an "ideal" journey and to explore changes that would improve the service experience. The use of journey mapping or blueprinting is based on an innovative approach to library users recently reported from the Center for American Progress (Ostrom et al. 2011). This report serves as a basis for a new way of looking at the academic experience, one that reimagines educational offerings and service from the student's point of view. Further, it partners with students to learn about and eliminate student pain points. 

3:00-3:30 Bringing Student Learning to Life: A Faculty/Librarian Partnership Through the Human Library

Librarians endeavor to engage students and faculty with the library. The hike can be frustrating and sometimes feels like it is all uphill, but the oxygen-deprivation and tired muscles are a worthy investment for the views along the way. The augustana human library takes students on their own journey by providing them with a unique way to explore a research topic through real-life narratives. This presentation describes library/faculty collaboration on assignments for undergraduate courses in women's studies and developmental psychology. Students ‘read’ Human Books who speak about firsthand experiences relevant to the course. For women’s studies, topics have included eating disorders, being transgender, bisexuality, losing a child, and sexual abuse. For psychology, topics have included autism, parenting a premature baby, and being visually impaired. Faculty members report that students value the human library as a way to integrate their learning with scholarly information. The combination of information ‘formats’ (i.e. oral narratives and journal articles) provides them with a unique and immersive learning experience.


Speakers
avatar for Adrienne Alger

Adrienne Alger

eLearning Librarian, Mansfield Library at the University of Montana
avatar for Kara Blizzard

Kara Blizzard

Public Services Librarian, University of Alberta, Augustana Campus


Friday June 10, 2016 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Room 1130 Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

2:30pm

Teaching without a Harness: Learning to Love Untethered Instruction
Librarians at California State University Northridge have spent the previous year experimenting with their new iPad instructional classroom.  The room includes an iPad cart with 32 iPads for student use and an Apple TV that allows librarians to teach untethered.  Over the past year they have developed a set of best practices for teaching with mobile devices that they will share with participants.  Many educational apps are geared towards semester long classes; the presenters will also highlight and demonstrate apps that they have found particularly useful for one-shot library instruction sessions. The workshop will benefit librarians who teach untethered with a tablet, who teach in an iPad classroom, who teach in a traditional computer lab, and anyone interested in converting their classroom from desktop to tablet technology. Participants will be encouraged to bring their own devices to take part in active learning activities using some of the apps demonstrated.  

Speakers
avatar for Susanna Eng-Ziskin

Susanna Eng-Ziskin

Acting Chair, Reference, Instruction, & Outreach Services, California State University, Northridge


Friday June 10, 2016 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Gould Auditorium Open Space Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

2:30pm

Setback? Exploring Failure and Resilience in the Library
Conversations around failure and resilience can be as vital to building a foundation for academic success as studying and hard work. The ability to "bounce back" from academic setbacks in turn influences retention, a key goal of any educational institution. As the library and the "largest classroom on campus," what could our role be in consciously fostering resilience and the "growth mindset" that reinforces the desire to learn?  Be prepared to embrace failure, reflect on  your own mindset, and discuss how we can encourage students to carry on to the summit!   

Speakers
avatar for Yvonne Phillips

Yvonne Phillips

Librarian, Red Deer College Library
Yvonne has been a Librarian at Red Deer College Library in Red Deer, Alberta, Canada since 2008. Her current interests include improving library user experiences and running an unofficial book adoption agency for deselected titles.


Friday June 10, 2016 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Room 1150 Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

2:30pm

Constructing Knowledge in the Health Sciences: A Range of Possibilities
This interactive session will explore the implications of the new ACRL Information Literacy Framework for health sciences education, specifically in the areas of evidence-based practice, case-based learning, clinical reasoning, and interprofessional education. We will collectively describe knowledge practices and dispositions as they apply to the health sciences in general, and to anticipate and mitigate differences among specific disciplines (e.g. nursing, medicine, pharmacology) in order to foster an environment for learning and practice that encourages reflection, inquiry, and collaboration. Although the disciplinary framework of this session will be health sciences education, we anticipate that the process of thinking through these issues with fellow practitioners and reflecting deeply on knowledge practices will benefit any librarian or educator who is interested in developing information literacy instruction that is more dynamic and intentional. 

Speakers
avatar for Kerri Shaffer Carter

Kerri Shaffer Carter

Director of Education, University of Utah School of Medicine
avatar for Erin Wimmer

Erin Wimmer

Teaching & Learning Librarian, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library
Teaching & Learning Librarian at the Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah


Friday June 10, 2016 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Room 1170 Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)

2:30pm

Navigating the Sea of Information: Creating DLOs to Empower Students to Develop Their Own Information Literacy Compass
Using the Threshold "Searching as Strategic Exploration," presenters created a DLO (digital learning object) using the analogy of navigating the sea as a way of explaining how students can find quality, relevant information. The DLOs target choosing a topic, developing a search strategy and navigating the world of information. This presentation will talk about the process of creating, assessing, and disseminating the DLOs to both in-person and online classes. The presenters will discuss challenges and successes. Presenters used instructional design principles and experimented with emerging technologies in the DLO creation. Assessment tools also were embedded into the instruction tutorial. The presenters also will report on the findings of a survey of other librarians about how they are incorporating the new Framework into their online instruction, what tools or technologies they are using to create digital learning objects, and how they are addressing assessment. 

View the Prezi

Speakers
avatar for Laurie Borchard

Laurie Borchard

Digital Learning Initiatives Librarian, California State University, Northridge
I create information literacy tutorials and I'm active in OER initiatives on my campus. I love working with students and experimenting with new technology!
avatar for Charissa Jefferson

Charissa Jefferson

Business and Data Librarian, California State University, Northridge
avatar for Felicia Vertrees

Felicia Vertrees

Online Instructional Design and Education Librarian, California State University, Northridge
Felicia M. Vertrees is the Online Instructional Design and Education Librarian at California State University in Northridge, California. She is also one of the 2015 recipients of her university’s eLearning Grant to develop technology-enhanced learning tools for students. Felicia has created more than 30 digital objects and taught virtual classes using Google+. She obtained her MLIS from San Jose State University, in San Jose, California in... Read More →


Friday June 10, 2016 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Room 1725 Marriott Library (University of Utah campus)